The University of Georgia

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Featured Project

A structural model of chemokine CCL5 oligomerization determined by a combination of NMR, MS, and SAXS approaches provides a framework for prediction of proteoglycan interactions and mechanism for proteoglycan-mediated oligomerization.

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Featured Instrumentation

Instrumentation employed to study glycan-protein interaction geometry, interaction motifs, domain-domain and protein-protein interaction geometries on complex glycoprotein targets using novel NMR approaches.

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Featured Project

Hydroxy radical footprinting is being deployed using LC-MS and electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) fragmentation to examine the details of interaction interface residues down to the single amino acid residue level.

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Featured Project

NMR chemical shift perturbations identify different binding sites for CS and HS on the LINK-TSG6 module.

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Co-receptor function of heparan sulfate in Slit3-Robo4 signaling

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Featured Project

Web tool, termed the Glycosaminoglycan Builder, has been developed to create molecular structures of glycosaminoglycans for visualization or docking studies.

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Service and Training

Detailed structural characterization of GAG oligo- and polysaccharides using 1-D and 2-D NMR is provided by the Analytical Service and Training Laboratory at the CCRC.

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Featured Project

Large scale production of glycosylated enzymes and glycan binding proteins in mammalian cells provides reagents for structural and functional studies.

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Mass spectrometry sequences full length glycans from the proteoglycan bikunin

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Heparan sulfate (HS) oligosaccharide arrays for examination of ligand requirements of HS binding proteins

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Sequencing of Complex Mixtures of Heparan Sulfate Tetrasaccharides by Chemical Derivatization and LC-MS/MS

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Featured Project

Mapping of protein-glycan interactions by high structural resolution hydroxy radical protein footprinting

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The central goals of the Resource for Integrated Glycotechnology are to increase understanding of the molecular and functional roles of protein-carbohydrate interactions and develops more powerful technologies necessary to achieve these goals.
Complex carbohydrates play an important role in many biomedically important processes, including inflammatory response, hormone action, malignancy, viral and bacterial infections and cell differentiation. This Resource is focused on the developing a novel, integrated toolkit of technologies that will address the challenges of determining the structures of carbohydrates, details of their interactions with binding proteins, and elucidation of their biological functions by leveraging advances in analytical, synthetic, structural, biochemical and biological tools. Three broad Technology Research and Development (TR&D) projects are being pursued in concert with a collection of Driving Biomedical Projects (DBPs). These latter projects act as test bed platforms for assessing the utility of the integrated approaches and provide feedback for new challenges that will spur further technology development.
As the technologies mature they are being applied to a collection of Collaborative Projects and used in Analytical Services that extend the utility of the technologies to the broader scientific community. Multiple strategies for Dissemination, including this website, will increase awareness and access to technology developments. Training courses provide direct opportunities for researchers to learn the latest technology developments from Resource staff.

The Resource for Integrated Glycotechnology is supported by a grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (GM103390) of the National Institutes of Health.